Greensboro Council #418,
Greensboro, North Carolina

Editors:

Rick Horne

Lodge Details

Chartered
1933
Changed name

Lodge Details

Lodge Totem/Insignia Unknown

Name Translation

Membership No Membership Data

Recent Updates

Recent Additions

Lodge History

In 1933 Greensboro Council hired Frank Braden to become its Scout Executive. Mr. Braden was an experience professional and came from Birmingham, AL where he was a charter member of Cherokee Lodge 50. In a spring newsletter to scout leaders he announced that an Order of the Arrow lodge would be started that summer at Camp Graystone. Two Cherokee Lodge members joined Mr. Braden that summer on staff and the three conducted the inital ceremonies. When the council submitted its application for an OA Lodge they left the space for a lodge name blank.` The new members wanted an Indian name for Graystone. In the fall the lodge chose the Blue Heron to be its totem.

On June 13, 1934 the Grand Lodge sent a Dues statement to Frank Braden referencing “Greystone Lodge”. At that time the OA had not yet assigned lodge numbers and the Greensboro lodge records were kept in File #58. On July 6, 1934 the OA acknowledged receiving the lodge dues and the file shows to send the 1934 Charter. During the summer of 1934 there were 20 candidates elected during the four weeks of camp to join the lodge.

A “Roster of Active Lodges” dated November 15, 1934 list “Greystone” lodge with Frank W. Braden as Executive for Greensboro. The Dues statement dated January 22, 1935 shows Greystone Lodge, W.W.W. #70. The lodge number “70” was assigned by the Grand Lodge.

Since the early days of the OA there has been a story on how the Greensboro lodge chose its name. The lodge wrote a letter to Daniel Carter Beard, the BSA National Commissioner, and asked for his assistance. Mr. Beard was noted for his knowledge of Indian ways so the lodge asked him to help them identify an appropriate name. The lodge had chosen the blue heron to be its totem and the council camp was known for, and named after, a large outcropping of granite which was affectionately known as the “graystone”. Mr. Beard wrote back to tell the lodge that “Tali Taktaki” meant “Blue Heron on a Gray Stone”. In 1935 the lodge chose these words to be the name of the lodge. Finally on a “Roster of Active Lodges as of September 4, 1936” the Greensboro lodge was listed as “Tali Taktaki” with the number 70.